Don’t Ask Friends/Family to be Your Executor, Unless …

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As the team member assigned to write this piece, I asked Now Sorted’s founder his views on whether or not to accept becoming an Executor of an estate. He told us that he had declined an invitation from his dear brother some years ago and would lean that way towards a request from anyone else in the future. I asked him why?

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He faked it – She fixed it

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One way we keep on top of client needs is to carefully listen to them. Every month or so we run Q-&-A sessions with clients and their friends. A key motivation is to keep our ears tuned for ideas and innovations to add useful functionality for all users. However, we frequently hear entertaining insights into how our software engages people. Here’s a recent example.

 

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From drudgery to delight

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Two sensations arise when we get the urge to organise something personal: the first is the grudging acceptance that “Yes, I really need to get this done”; the second is the sense of pending drudgery that comes with the task.  Well, now, a third sensation has emerged: one of ‘delight’. It is not an exaggeration to state that the team at Now Sorted has made the job of organising so simple that dull drudgery is out … and diligent delight is in.

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Supreme Benefits of Being Organised + A Freebie

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We live in an age of overload – and, wow, don’t we know it. Never have there been so many ways to distract our senses: news (including ‘fake news’) comes from countless sources; people we don’t even know alert us to ‘interesting and/or amusing’ videos designed to titillate eyes and ears. And yet, for every minute we are distracted, we fail to organise something of importance. Ridiculous isn’t it? So here are a few key points on the significant benefits of sorting ourselves out. Read more

Now Sorted – How it Began

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Two men, in their mid-forties, are chatting over a business breakfast. Suddenly, one excuses himself and goes to the bathroom. He is sweating slightly, feels uncomfortable, splashes some cold water on his face. He returns to the table, apologises to his colleague and suggests they defer their discussion to another day. With that, he pays the bill, tips the waiter and proceeds to his car. He wonders what just happened?  Within an hour he learns he’d undergone a heart attack – an event that changed his life forever.

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